A lucky man was he

Alfred Edward Chilcott was born 23 Jul 1893 at Spaxton in Somerset, England. His parents were James Chilcott and Sarah Type. On 3 Nov 1928 he married Ethel Nellie Emery Baker at Spaxton. Alfred was my half 1st cousin 3x removed, connected to me by my 3rd great-grandfather William Chilcott who was baptised at St... Continue Reading →

Boy Drowned in a Ditch

Supposed Epileptic Seizure Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald 29 January 1916 The East Kent Coroner  (Mr. Rutley Mowll) held an inquest on Thursday on the body of Charles Sidney George Foord, 14, who was found dead in a ditch at Stone Cross Road, Bilsington. Evidence was given by Mrs. Mary Ann Foord, Chequer Tree... Continue Reading →

Found Working With Stolen Tools

Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald 27 February 1937 Two Young Men Before The Magistrates Two young Petham men were found working with tools wich they had stolen appeared before the magistrates at St. Augustine's Petty Sessions at Herne Bay, on Wednesday. They were Stanley Austin Jarvis (21), Town Road, Petham, and Stanley Hope (17),... Continue Reading →

Died of Wounds 16 Nov 1918

Even though the war had ended on 11 Nov 1918 there were many wounded that continued to die after that date. William Thomas Goldup, my 1st cousin 2x removed was one of those. William was born about Mar 1896 at Egerton, Kent - near Ashford. He was the 5th of 10 children born to Charles... Continue Reading →

“Look Mum, I’m All Alight.”

Tragedy at Tyler Hill - extracted from Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald of 27 Jul 1935. While engaged with her mother in washing in a yard at the rear of her house at Tyler Hill on Monday, Miss Edith Mary Kemp, aged 28, was fatally burned through her clothes being set alight owing to... Continue Reading →

K.I.A. 13 Nov 1916

Born in Elham, Kent on 29 Mar 1878, William Pegden lived at 2 Downs View Cottages in Shoulden Bank in 1911 and was an above ground labourer at a colliery. William was a sapper in the Royal Marines, 2nd Field Company, Divisional Engineers (Deal/1093(S)). He was 5 feet 6 1/2 inches tall with Black eyes... Continue Reading →

159 Years Ago Today at SS Gregory & Martin

Above Photo of SS Gregory & Martin - Poliphilo [CC0], from Wikimedia Commons On 13 Nov 1859 at SS Gregory & Martin in Wye, Kent my 2nd great grandparents - William Young and Harriet Raines were married. William was an agricultural labourer and later a farm waggoner. Harriet was sometimes a servant and domestic house keeper.... Continue Reading →

Bartholomew Bowlt

Bartholomew George Stephenson Bowlt was the son of Frederick William Bowlt, a boiler maker with the S.E.C. Railway Company and Olive Louisa Aldridge. He was one of 8 children and was born 8 Jul 188 in Dover, Kent. Baptism - Buckland, St. Andrew, 11 Aug 1888 Bartholomew served as a Fireman in the Mercantile Marine... Continue Reading →

The Sinking Of H.M.S. Exeter

H.M.S. Exeter pictured above from the Western Morning News of 16 Mar 1942. H.M.S. Exeter was an 8,500 ton cruiser and was one of 12 warships lost over three days during the Japanese invasion of Java. The battle was from 27 Feb to 1 Mar. The Exeter, of Graf Spee fame - she exchanged shell... Continue Reading →

Montgomery Crowe

Today, Montgomery Crowe was added to the United Kingdom Book of Remembrance which commemorates 361 United Kingdom casualties of the two World Wars who were not formerly recorded by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. The men and women remembered here are presently commemorated solely by their database and register entry. The Commission will continue to investigate... Continue Reading →

Using the 1939 Register with Mapstr

While not written for genealogy, Mapstr is a useful tool for that purpose. "Mapstr lets you keep track of all your favourite places around the world, tag them, and find them on your very own map!" See the Mapstr site for more details - it is available for IOS and Android and is free at... Continue Reading →

Double Banns

During World War One many servicemen would have married before going off to war and others after returning. It appears some had to make several tries to get married during the war. One such person was Arthur Twist, a Leading Stoker and later Stoker Perry Officer on the H.M.S. Falmouth and my 3rd cousin 3x... Continue Reading →

Queen Mary’s Army Auxiliary Corps

Born today at White Cottage, Sarre, Kent was my great-aunt Charlotte Elizabeth Young. The 5th of seven children to William Young and Mary Ann Hayward. Charlotte was baptised at St Nicholas, St Nicholas at Wade, Kent on 26 Apr 1898. On 23 Sep 1918 Charlotte married Robert Alfred Stothard in Bekesbourne, Kent. They had 4... Continue Reading →

Herald of Free Enterprise

On 6 Mar 2017 a 30th anniversay service was held in Dover for the Zeebrugge ferry disaster. See Kent Online and Keeping love alive The second link has a photo of Peter McNeill, son of Lynda Burt, 38, a stewardess from Dover, who lost her life in the tradgedy. Lynda was our 4th cousin. You can read about... Continue Reading →

The hand grenade explosion

Image above: A female worker inspects Mills hand grenades in a British factory during the First World War. Wikimedia Commons. Public Domain.  Dover Express 3 Nov 1916 Yesterday afternoon the Borough Coroner (Mr. Sydenham Payn) held an inquest on the body of the little girl, Edith Ellen Hanson, who was on July 19th last injured... Continue Reading →

Train roof crawl

Yorkshire Evening Post 16 Dec 1952 A 43-year-old horticultural foreman, Mr. Leslie Ashman, of Daisy Bank, Ditton, near Maidstone (Kent), was today presented with the honorary certificate of the Carnegie Hero Trust Fund by the Mayor of Maidsotne, Ald. Mrs. D. M. Relf. Mr. Ashman, on August 11, when travelling as a passenger on the... Continue Reading →

Drewry’s Bluff, 16 May 1864

Image above: Battery Dantzler, Drewry's Bluff 1864 - Confederate gun commanding the river. The 117th New York Infantry recruited in the Oneida county in the summer of 1862, rendezvoused at Rome, and was mustered into the U.S. service from August 8 to 16, for three years and left the state on August 22. On 12... Continue Reading →

They came home from the trenches

When we talk about World War One, we most often talk about those who gave their lives and never returned home. But many did come home, and of those a lot had suffered wounds, injuries and disease. Percy Raines Fisher, my 4th cousin 2x removed was one of those. He had been born on 23... Continue Reading →

Wholesale garden robbery

Cabbage and broccoli? It wasn't kids then. In the Western Gazette of 29 Nov 1867 we read the following: Some time during the night of Tuesday, the 19th inst., a large quantity of cabbage, broccoli, and other vegetables, growing in a garden at Staplehay, in this parish (Pitminster), and belonging to Charles Clarke Mattock, coachman... Continue Reading →

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