They came home from the trenches

When we talk about World War One, we most often talk about those who gave their lives and never returned home. But many did come home, and of those a lot had suffered wounds, injuries and disease. Percy Raines Fisher, my 4th cousin 2x removed was one of those. He had been born on 23... Continue Reading →

Cavalry Foot Soldiers

The Household Battalion was an infantry battalion of the British army during the Great War. It was formed in September 1916 from the reserves of the Household Cavalry regiments (the 1st Life Guards, 2nd Life Guards and the Royal Horse Guards) to help fill the every-increasing demands for infantry on the Western Front. Considerable effort... Continue Reading →

Maid of Kent

S. R. Hospital Ships Lost Dover Express 7 Jun 1940 The loss of the hospital ship "Maid of Kent" was officially announced in the shipping losses for the week ending May 26th. The "Brighton," another hospital ship, was sunk by an attack at the same time in Dieppe Harbour. Both are Southern Railway vessels. The... Continue Reading →

From Dunkirk to D-Day

Why the flags were out Sevenoaks men home from Dunkirk When Guardsman James Berry reached his home at 146 Seal Road, Sevenoaks, on Saturday he was greeted with fluttering Union Jacks and a streamer on which were the words: "Welcome Home." Guardsman Berry, aged 21, who is the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Berry,... Continue Reading →

Death floats lightly

A rumble of airplanes can be heard in the night sky, but it is paid no heed because it is now almost constant. Loud bangs approach and recede again, recorded only in the subconscious. Flashes of light occur, ignored through the black out curtains. And then silence. Death approaches, but you are unaware. And then........ Continue Reading →

“For Freedom”

No. 408 "Goose" Squadron was a Royal Canadian Air Force Squadron, based in Britain and under Royal Air Force operational command. The squadron operated as part of Bomber Command's main force from 24 Jun 1941 until the end of the war. From Jan 1943 it was part of No. 6 (RCAF) Group. The squadrons motto... Continue Reading →

In the cold of France

A sentry post in France - Liverpool Daily Post 03 February 1940 France. February 1940. The landscape is snow-covered and there are temperatures of 10 degrees below zero. Three men died after bringing a brazier inside their billet to keep warm. Special leave to Britain is allowed and some men go home to get married.... Continue Reading →

L/Cpl weds at end of war

The wedding took place at St. Bartholomew's Church, on Satruday, 29 Sep 1945 between L/Cpl. R. J. Bent and Nancy Kennett. Dover Express 5 Oct 1945 Dover Express 02 April 1948 The High Alter at St. Bartholomew's Church Nancy Matilda Kennett was my 1st cousin 1x removed, daughter of my Grand aunt Annie Jane Hawkins.... Continue Reading →

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