Wholesale garden robbery

Cabbage and broccoli? It wasn't kids then. In the Western Gazette of 29 Nov 1867 we read the following: Some time during the night of Tuesday, the 19th inst., a large quantity of cabbage, broccoli, and other vegetables, growing in a garden at Staplehay, in this parish (Pitminster), and belonging to Charles Clarke Mattock, coachman... Continue Reading →

Cavalry Foot Soldiers

The Household Battalion was an infantry battalion of the British army during the Great War. It was formed in September 1916 from the reserves of the Household Cavalry regiments (the 1st Life Guards, 2nd Life Guards and the Royal Horse Guards) to help fill the every-increasing demands for infantry on the Western Front. Considerable effort... Continue Reading →

The Boys’ Brigade

Extracting from the Kent & Sussex Courier of 25 Oct 1907 we learn that the beginning of the Boys' Brigade was in 1883 in Glasgow and it was an institution that was working against hooliganism with extraordinary success. The objects of the Boys' Brigade were to combat the terrible evil of boys lounging about the... Continue Reading →

Maid of Kent

S. R. Hospital Ships Lost Dover Express 7 Jun 1940 The loss of the hospital ship "Maid of Kent" was officially announced in the shipping losses for the week ending May 26th. The "Brighton," another hospital ship, was sunk by an attack at the same time in Dieppe Harbour. Both are Southern Railway vessels. The... Continue Reading →

Death from misadventure

Engine Driver's Fatal Fall The East Kent Coroner (Mr. Rutley Mow II) held an inquest at Derringstone, Barham, on Wednesday evening, on the body of Charles Henry Lilley, aged 44, an engine driver in the employ of Mr. A. C. Arter, Barham, who died as the result of a fall from a truck. The evidence... Continue Reading →

From Dunkirk to D-Day

Why the flags were out Sevenoaks men home from Dunkirk When Guardsman James Berry reached his home at 146 Seal Road, Sevenoaks, on Saturday he was greeted with fluttering Union Jacks and a streamer on which were the words: "Welcome Home." Guardsman Berry, aged 21, who is the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Berry,... Continue Reading →

Olympic Flame at Dover

Now that the Olympics are on in South Korea, I will relate the story of our family's brief connection with the Olympics in 1948. Birmingham Daily Gazette 29 Jul 1948: The Olympic Flame reached Dover last night on the last lap of it 2,000 journey across Europe from Greece to Wembley Stadium. It was borne... Continue Reading →

Lilley of Brabourne

On 16 Oct 1860, as reported in the Southeastern Gazette, Mary Lilley, landlady of the Five Bells at Brabourne, Kent, was a witness in a case of horse stealing as was one Thomas Lilley. The license of the Five Bells had ben transferred from William Fox to Thomas Lilley in August of 1855. The Five... Continue Reading →

The tin family

The manufacture of tinplate in Britain began early in the eighteenth century and involved rolling iron plates and coating them with tin. You can read an excellent article on this here - An Industrial Work-Force - Kidwelly Tin Workers 1881 by Muriel Bowen Evans. The interiors of Trefforest Tin Works showing men, women and boys... Continue Reading →

Death floats lightly

A rumble of airplanes can be heard in the night sky, but it is paid no heed because it is now almost constant. Loud bangs approach and recede again, recorded only in the subconscious. Flashes of light occur, ignored through the black out curtains. And then silence. Death approaches, but you are unaware. And then........ Continue Reading →

Jutland or Skagerrak?

To the Germans it was the Battle of Skagerrak and was celebrated as a victory until after World War Two, they even named their second "pocket battleship" Skagerrack in 1933. And perhaps it was, the British certainly lost more ships and men than the Germans did. To the British it was the Battle of Jutland... Continue Reading →

“For Freedom”

No. 408 "Goose" Squadron was a Royal Canadian Air Force Squadron, based in Britain and under Royal Air Force operational command. The squadron operated as part of Bomber Command's main force from 24 Jun 1941 until the end of the war. From Jan 1943 it was part of No. 6 (RCAF) Group. The squadrons motto... Continue Reading →

In the cold of France

  Above Photo: A sentry post in France - Liverpool Daily Post 03 February 1940 France. February 1940. The landscape is snow-covered and there are temperatures of 10 degrees below zero. Three men died after bringing a brazier inside their billet to keep warm. Special leave to Britain is allowed and some men go home... Continue Reading →

Portsmouth Town, Colewart Barracks

In the narrow streets that form the old town of Portsmouth, are the Colewort Barracks. At the back of the barracks, in 1839, the church of St. Mary was built. Colewort Barracks is where my great-grandmother, Maud Mary Mattock was born on 5 Feb 1870 according to her birth certificate. From birth certificate Her father,... Continue Reading →

Runaway horse and van

A Southern Railway Motor Driver, Arthur George Aldridge was my 4th cousin 2x removed. He was born 21 Dec 1893 in Dover to Arthur George Aldridge and Harriet Kingsland. He enlisted in the Buffs (East Kent Regiment) 2nd Battalion on 6 Mar 1911 and later served in the Labour Corps - 583rd Home Service Supply completing... Continue Reading →

Kut-el-Amara claims an English bricklayer

”It was during the advance at Sheik Said a shrapnel shell came along and killed the Adjutant, wounded the Colonel, killed Corpl. Luckhurst, and also killed a private." So said a comrade of Corporal Harry Luckhurst, T/1638 5th Battalion of The Buffs (East Kent Regiment) my 1st cousin 2x removed who was killed in action... Continue Reading →

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genealogy & family history

THE HISTORICAL DIARIES

LOOKING INTO THE PAST ....

Sally's Cousins

Our Family Trees for Growing and Sharing

History in the (Re)Making

History, Historical Fiction and everything in between

Somerset & Dorset Family History Society

The SDFHS helps people, wherever they live, to research their family history and to help add local context and connections to the basic information they may already have found. Website: www.sdfhs.org

The Perimeter

Quintin Lake's photographic Journey walking around Britain's Coast

Sevenoaks WW1

Researching and remembering the people of Sevenoaks, Kent during the First World War

HistorianRuby: An Historian's Miscellany

Early modern historian. Loves gender, women's, social & royal histories. Ventures elswhere when interest is piqued. Blog may cover above themes or something a little more random. Find me on Twitter @ruthrblair